Have slow internet? Utah wants to know where to help with broadband access





Jazmin Rascon and twin sister Judith work on their laptops on the front steps of their home in Delta on April 8, 2020. The Utah Broadband Center is asking Utahns to report their internet speeds at home, work or wherever they are online for a campaign to map areas with low speeds or no internet connection in the state. (Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News)

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SALT LAKE CITY — Have a slow internet connection? Utah wants to find out where broadband speeds are lagging.

The Utah Broadband Center is asking Utahns to report their internet speeds at home, work or wherever they are online for a campaign to map areas with low speeds or no internet connection in the state, according to a statement from the Governor’s Office for Economic Opportunity. The data will be mapped in cooperation with GeoPartners, a geospatial engineering firm.

The self-reported data will then be used as a guide for future projects that would aim to make high-speed internet more readily available around Utah. Data collected from the survey will include location, internet speed and monthly internet cost, according to the website. The data collected is secure and the results will be anonymous.

“The pandemic has heightened the awareness and need for robust internet service statewide, and we encourage all Utahns to take just one minute to participate in the internet speed test,” said Ryan Starks, managing director of Business Services for Go Utah, in a statement . Go Utah is the organization that runs the Utah Broadband Center.

All Utah residents are encouraged to go to speedtest.utah.gov and self-report their internet speed. Residents can also identify areas with little or no internet, or where internet access is unaffordable, according to the office for economic opportunity. For areas without internet, you can still report areas by calling 1-435-777-TEST (8378). The speed test is available in both English and Spanish.

There’s no limit to the number of times residents can complete the speed test, as multiple tests allow for more accurate data to be collected.

“Access to reliable and affordable internet connectivity has become increasingly important in our daily lives, and without it, individuals lack access to critical digital resources, such as distance learning, telework, and telemedicine,” Starks said.

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